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Here are some of the more common issues that we address at Aspen Surgical Arts.

Do I Need my wisdom teeth out?

When should they be removed?

The Procedure

Photo of impacted teeth

Do I Need my wisdom teeth out?

 

If you routinely see your dentist or your Orthodontist, then likely you've either been told if you have room for your wisdom teeth or not. Adults naturally have 32 teeth and the wisdom teeth are the last teeth to erupt. Most people don't have room for their wisdom teeth. Partially erupted teeth may cause problems for the surrounding gum tissue or the adjacent teeth.

 

Problems commonly seen with impacted wisdom teeth are decay and damage to the adjacent teeth, Periodontal disease, or cysts. Patients usually first start complaining of pressure, pain, and shifting of teeth. If you don't have room for these teeth, It is usually best to get them out before you begin experiences problems.  Ideally, if the wisdom teeth have a high probability of causing problems, removing them before the root fully forms speeds the healing process and reduces potential risk.  

 

 

Photo of impacted teeth

When should wisdom teeth be removed?

 

If wisdom teeth have high indications that they will cause future problems, then they should be removed when the risk is lowest for complications. This is usually when the roots are in early development and not fully formed - in the mid teenage years.

 

 When the roots are immature, there is less tooth structure to remove which results in a quicker healing process. There is also usually protective bone between the end of the developing roots and the nerve that gives you feeling to the lower lip and chin. As the roots continue to fully form the risk of potential nerve injury increases.

 

 

 

Photo of impacted teeth

The Procedure

 

Removal of a wisdom teeth differ depending on the level of impaction, however in most cases the following is preformed. The doctor exposes the tooth and bone through a small incision in the gum. Any bone that may prevent access to the impacted tooth is cleared.  The tooth may be segmented if necessary for easier removal and to reduce potential risk to the nerve. The impacted tooth is then extracted. The doctor ensures that location of removed tooth is free of any bone or tooth debris. The incision may be sutured if necessary. Gauze and firm pressure are used to promote blood clot formation and stop bleeding.

 

Wisdom teeth are usually removed under sedation for the patients comfort. Anesthesia can be tailored to give you a comfortable and safe  experience. This will be discussed at your initial evaluation.

 

 

ABOUT US

Aspen Surgical Arts is led by  highly trained, board certified surgeons who specialize in the most advanced methods for oral and facial surgery: Julia R. Plevnia DDS Daniel Escalante DMD and Jeremy R. Jannuzzi, DMD, MD

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CONTACT US

19700 E. Parker Sq. Dr.

Parker, CO  80134

Tel: (303) 840-2300

Fax: 303-840-8610

Email: Office@AspenSurgicalArts.com

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© 2018 Aspen Surgical Arts

Photo of impacted teeth
Photo of impacted teeth
Photo of impacted teeth
  • Do I need my Wisdom Teeth out?

     

     

    If you routinely see your dentist or your Orthodontist, then likely you've either been told if you have room for your wisdom teeth or not. Adults naturally have 32 teeth and the wisdom teeth are the last teeth to erupt. Most people don't have room for their wisdom teeth. Partially erupted teeth may cause problems for the surrounding gum tissue or the adjacent teeth.

     

    Problems commonly seen with impacted wisdom teeth are decay and damage to the adjacent teeth, Periodontal disease, or cysts. Patients usually first start complaining of pressure, pain, and shifting of teeth. If you don't have room for these teeth, It is usually best to get them out before you begin experiences problems.  Ideally, if the wisdom teeth have a high probability of causing problems, removing them before the root fully forms speeds the healing process and reduces potential risk.

     

  • When should wisdom teeth be removed?

    When should wisdom teeth be removed?

     

    If wisdom teeth have high indications that they will cause future problems, then they should be removed when the risk is lowest for complications. This is usually when the roots are in early development and not fully formed - in the mid teenage years.

     

     When the roots are immature, there is less tooth structure to remove which results in a quicker healing process. There is also usually protective bone between the end of the developing roots and the nerve that gives you feeling to the lower lip and chin. As the roots continue to fully form the risk of potential nerve injury increases.

     

  • The Procedure

    The Procedure

     

    Removal of a wisdom teeth differ depending on the level of impaction, however in most cases the following is preformed. The doctor exposes the tooth and bone through a small incision in the gum. Any bone that may prevent access to the impacted tooth is cleared.  The tooth may be segmented if necessary for easier removal and to reduce potential risk to the nerve. The impacted tooth is then extracted. The doctor ensures that location of removed tooth is free of any bone or tooth debris. The incision may be sutured if necessary. Gauze and firm pressure are used to promote blood clot formation and stop bleeding.

     

    Wisdom teeth are usually removed under sedation for the patients comfort. Anesthesia can be tailored to give you a comfortable and safe  experience. This will be discussed at your initial evaluation.