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Here are some of the more common issues that we address at Aspen Surgical Arts.

Facial Trauma

Understanding Facial Trauma

 

The occurrence of facial trauma involves much more than the isolated injury to the face. Motor vehicle accidents, accidental falls, sports injuries, interpersonal violence, and work-related injuries are some of the most common reasons for facial trauma. Types of facial injuries can range from injuries to teeth to extremely severe injuries to the skin, bones of the face, and involve deeper structures such as nerves or salivary glands. Often the force of a trauma causing damage to one area of the facial tissues is enough to cause multiple injuries. Treating a patient after a trauma is a team approach. A facial injury is physically, mentally, and emotionally traumatizing to the patient and requires a surgeon that has experience and expert skill in dealing with facial trauma.

 

Oral surgeons are uniquely trained and qualified to comprehensively treat patients that suffer the full spectrum of facial traumatic injuries. Dr. Plevnia and Dr. Escalante,  having trained in the U.S. Army,  have extensive experience managing facial trauma. Dr. Plevnia and Dr. Escalante are both on staff at Littleton Adventist Hospital and provide on-call coverage for facial trauma including:

 

  • Fractures to either or both Jaws
  • Fractured facial bones including forehead, nose, orbits,     and cheekbones
  • Knocked out or displaced teeth
  • Fractures of the bone holding the teeth in their sockets (alveolar fracture)
  • Facial lacerations
  • Intra-oral lacerations
  • Deep infections of the head and neck.

Types of Facial Trauma

Dr. Plevnia and Dr. Escalante are expertly trained in initial treatments of facial injuries as well as long term facial reconstruction.

Jaw Fractures

Soft Tissue Injuries

Facial Fractures

  •   Bone fractures in the face need to be stabilized for the bone to properly heal.  The benefit of properly treating a broken bone is to facilitate healing and return the bone and surrounding soft tissue to its pre-injury form and function.
  • Untreated or inadequately treated injuries run the risk of improper healing that can have life long drastic effects which may require surgery as well as orthodontics (braces) in the future to correct.
  • These types of injuries are traumatic physically, but also have a high degree of emotional trauma for the patient. There is a science and an art to treating these injuries, and Doctors Plevnia and Escalante are uniquely qualified to manage and treat these types of injuries.  They are also on staff at surrounding hospitals, and provide emergency room coverage for facial trauma injuries.

 

 

  • Soft tissue injuries include lacerations to the face and intra oral lacerations.  These are repaired by suturing, or stitching.
  • Oral & Maxillofacial surgeons are trained to take care to obtain the best cosmetic results possible.
  • They also carefully inspect and treat injuries to facial nerves, salivary glands, and salivary ducts.
  • It is important that not only the soft tissue on the face is treated, but the underlying structures as well.

 

  • Fractures of the facial bones (cheek, nose, eye socket, jaw) must be stabilized, much as any other bone in the body that has been fractured.
  • Since a cast cannot be applied to the face, as it would to an arm or leg, oral surgeons must use other methods for stabilization. Rigid fixation is one method, whereby the jaws are stabilized by surgical placement of small plates and screws. This allows for healing of the bone, and is not as restrictive as when the jaws are wired together. Wiring the jaws together is more restrictive, but is also another treatment option.
  • Your doctor will determine the best form of treatment for the injury, based upon the location of the fracture, the severity of the injury, age of the patient, and general health. The ultimate goal is that the patient’s facial appearance is minimally affected. Any incisions made are designed to be small, and are placed so that the resulting scar is minimized or hidden as much as possible.

 

 

 

 

ABOUT US

Aspen Surgical Arts is led by  highly trained, board certified surgeons who specialize in the most advanced methods for oral and facial surgery: Julia R. Plevnia DDS Daniel Escalante DMD and Jeremy R. Jannuzzi, DMD, MD

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CONTACT US

19700 E. Parker Sq. Dr.

Parker, CO  80134

Tel: (303) 840-2300

Fax: 303-840-8610

Email: Office@AspenSurgicalArts.com

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© 2018 Aspen Surgical Arts

  • Jaw Fractures

    •   Bone fractures in the face need to be stabilized for the bone to properly heal.  The benefit of properly treating a broken bone is to facilitate healing and return the bone and surrounding soft tissue to its pre-injury form and function.
    • Untreated or inadequately treated injuries run the risk of improper healing that can have life long drastic effects which may require surgery as well as orthodontics (braces) in the future to correct.
    • These types of injuries are traumatic physically, but also have a high degree of emotional trauma for the patient. There is a science and an art to treating these injuries, and Doctors Plevnia and Escalante are uniquely qualified to manage and treat these types of injuries.  They are also on staff at surrounding hospitals, and provide emergency room coverage for facial trauma injuries.

     

     

  • Soft Tissue Injuries

    • Soft tissue injuries include lacerations to the face and intra oral lacerations.  These are repaired by suturing, or stitching.
    • Oral & Maxillofacial surgeons are trained to take care to obtain the best cosmetic results possible.
    • They also carefully inspect and treat injuries to facial nerves, salivary glands, and salivary ducts.
    • It is important that not only the soft tissue on the face is treated, but the underlying structures as well.

     

  • Facial Fractures

    • Fractures of the facial bones (cheek, nose, eye socket, jaw) must be stabilized, much as any other bone in the body that has been fractured.
    • Since a cast cannot be applied to the face, as it would to an arm or leg, oral surgeons must use other methods for stabilization. Rigid fixation is one method, whereby the jaws are stabilized by surgical placement of small plates and screws. This allows for healing of the bone, and is not as restrictive as when the jaws are wired together. Wiring the jaws together is more restrictive, but is also another treatment option.
    • Your doctor will determine the best form of treatment for the injury, based upon the location of the fracture, the severity of the injury, age of the patient, and general health. The ultimate goal is that the patient’s facial appearance is minimally affected. Any incisions made are designed to be small, and are placed so that the resulting scar is minimized or hidden as much as possible.